New Publication Hits the Streets Today

Sooner or later, most businesses will fall victim to a cyberattack. Companies like Anthem and Target—even the Democratic National Committee—stand as testament.

However, there has been little counsel available for executives who need to communicate in the midst of such an assault—until now, with the publication of my new position paper, “The Forgotten Fear Factor: Communicating During a Hack Attack.”

Let’s face it. There are plenty of resources out there offering solutions—often selling them—for the technical side of the problem. And rightfully so.

Here’s the problem: There is precious little intelligence outlining what to say to consumers, shareholders, members, and government regulators when hackers strike. All those parties need updates from the victimized company and they need them in real time.

Cybercrime

Here’s a brief excerpt:

“You have a plethora of resources at your disposal that cover certain aspects of batting back a hack attack—insurance that covers some of the damages, guidance from federal authorities as to your legal reporting requirements, and an ever-growing population of companies eager to (allegedly) protect you.

“The hard truth is, however, few if any of those resources are capable of walking you through what it takes to communicate when hackers worm their way into your systems. This paper examines that essential yet oft-ignored facet—managing the communications component of the crisis, for how you communicate with your stakeholders in the near- and long-term could spell the difference between survival and chronic struggle.”

“The Forgotten Fear Factor” contains real world advice and shows not only what to do, but also how to prepare, even if the precise nature of your attack may be uncertain. Stay tuned right here for in depth excerpts in weeks to come.

The new publication serves as an adjunct to the 2015 position paper, “Beyond the Bottom Line: 20 Ways to Reduce Reputational Risk.” As with all our research publications, “The Forgotten Fear Factor” is available at no charge.

I’m forever seeking feedback, so please include your reactions in the Comments section.

 

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